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GENESEE ACADEMY SOCIAL SCIENCE

LESSON 23

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World War One 

Page by: Tiffany Rubin, 2005 

The Great War was one of the most important conflicts in the history of the United States. Every American contributed in the effort in some way. It resulted in the greatest loss of life for any of the modern wars. It spawned a depression, the dividing of the German states, and a second world war.
What event sparked the beginning of the war?
What did President Wilson believe should be the role of the United States in foreign affairs?
What was the war on the Western Front about? Eastern Front? on the Atlantic?
How did the U-boats break the rules of the high seas? Why did the Zimmerman Note alarm many Americans?
How did the war effect African-Americans, women, and Mexican-Americans?
What weapons were used in WW1?
What were the outcomes of the Treaty of Versaiiles? How did the war end?

TERMS
nationalism                         Selective Service Act
imperialism                         Sedetion Act
alliances                              American Expeditionary Act
militarism                            Wobblies
Central Powers                  Espionage Act
Allies                                   Fourteen Points
Communist Revolution       League of Nations
Big Four                              reperations
no man's land                      mandate
trench warfare                   Versaiiles Peace Treaty 
Lusitania                             Sussex pledge
Zimmerman Note
 

AP EXAM QUESTIONS
2000 PART C
Question 4
To what extent did the United States achieve the objectives that led it to enter the First World War?
2007 FORM B, PART C
Question 5
Analyze the ways in which the federal government sought support on the home front for the war effort during the First World War.

READING TO CONSIDER
 
1. Who was Wilson?
2. What was the goal of the Fourteen Points?
3.SOAP

 
 
 
 
"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal,..." Declaration of Independence, 1776